inverse hypocrisy

yesterday i was writing a response to someone who was confused by some person’s conjecture regarding some random topic. and in my response, i stumbled on something new.

 

hippocrisy is litterally doing other than what you prescribe others, but it also has a connotation of simply not doing what you prescribe. and at a meta level i notice that sometimes saying you are going to do something precludes it’s eventual realization. that is, people say they want something, and by saying they want something there is a consequence (or series of consequence) which result in the ‘counter intuitive’ result of the exact opposite state of expressed desire existing. that is, saying you want some things can make it so you can’t actually achieve those things and actually set your progress towards the ‘desired’ (literally professed) goal backwards.

it isn’t the failure of earnest bargaining where you say what you actually want rather than exaggerate so the middle ground you settle on was what you originally wanted.

simply instead of your actions precluding your verse, it is your verse which precludes your actions. and which in the circumstance of actual accomplishment is actually worse. you can recommend not smoking to someone who doesn’t smoke as much as you do, and still have their best interests at heart. but you can’t as earnestly express an ideal/preference which is against the action itself. simply, if you say you want an icecream, but saying you want the icecream actually causes you not to get the icecream- did you really want it? does the inappropriate and inviable application of social technology towards a professed goal, not cause the ‘personal value’ of the goal to the one saying it has whatever worthy attributes it may have, to come into question? do you really want x if proclaiming you want it actually goes against your obtaining x?

it is a strange type of setting yourself up for failure. let me know if there is another more appropriate word for the concept. is it ‘silly’?

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